Wait Times For Patients Who Need Gastroenterology Care Are Getting Longer

Data was gathered from nearly 200 participating gastroenterologists who submitted information on approximately 2,000 patient interactions within the health system. SAGE surveys were also conducted in 2005 and 2008 . Over a seven-year period, the trend in longer wait times is evident according to soon to be published 2012 SAGE data. “Our analysis shows that patient wait times are now 30 days longer than they were in 2005,” says CAG Dr. Desmond Leddin, Lead on the CAG SAGE program. “This is a disturbing trend, and one which indicates a need to pursue strategies to ensure patients receive the digestive care they need in a more timely manner.” As an example, the recent SAGE data shows that a patient with a high likelihood of severe Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) can expect a total wait time of 126 days. Of these 126 days, patients wait on average 72 days for a consultation and 44 days for a diagnostic endoscopy. Given the target total wait time of 14 days for this disease category, these patients are waiting 16 weeks longer than the recommended wait time target. (See fact sheet ) “The gap between current wait times and the desired target is too wide and wait times are getting longer,” says Dr. Dan Sadowski, President of the CAG. “In human terms, what this means is that many patients live with pain and some are unable to work or attend school and can only do so with difficulty while waiting for consultation and treatment.” This year, the WTA report is shedding more light on the total wait time(i) Canadians can experience in receiving necessary medical care. Thanks to the total wait times data collected and provided by CAG, the WTA report is now more comprehensive than ever. “The CAG has been a source of robust information for our expanded focus on wait times”, says Dr. Chris Simpson, Chair, Wait Time Alliance. “Their data on total wait times for access to care, not just a portion of it, is extremely valuable to the WTA. It not only validates that total wait times are increasing, it contributes significant insight into the patient perspective on health care in Canada and reinforces the need for greater investments in timely access to care.” “With results over the last three surveys, we can plot trends in access to digestive care over a seven-year period,” says Dr.

web site http://finance.yahoo.com/news/wait-times-patients-gastroenterology-care-150600053.html

Advertisements

Zo Skin Health, Inc. Launches New Physician Retail Website As Part Of Protecting Physicians & Consumers From Internet Piracy

Zein Obagi, Medical Director of ZO Skin Health, Inc., and ZO Skin Health Inc., have launched a new blog to clear up the confusion about healthy skin issues for consumers. Dr. Obagi has always been passionate about educating consumers on the latest skincare technologies, a system approach to skincare, and how to care for acne, rosacea, and fight off wrinkles and skin aging. “I believe that patient education is vital. My hope is that I can arm consumers with as much information as they need to make the right choices for a lifetime of skin health and vitality,” stated Dr. Obagi. The new ZO blog explores questions that Dr. Obagi gets asked by his own patients and useful content on a wide range of topics such as sun protection, skin cancer, pigmentation problems, clearing up acne, age reversing treatments and more. Consumers can also submit new questions to the ZO team. Visit the new blog at: http://shop.zoskinhealth.com/blog/new-year-new-skin About ZO Skin Health, Inc. ZO Skin Health, Inc. develops and delivers innovative skincare solutions that optimize skin health around the globe.

use this link http://www.marketwatch.com/story/zo-skin-health-inc-launches-new-physician-retail-website-as-part-of-protecting-physicians-consumers-from-internet-piracy-2014-01-27

This Is What A Gluten-free Diet Did For Djokovic… So Can It Work For You Too?: It’s Been Dismissed As A Fad – But Novak (and Miley) Swear By Their No-wheat Regime

Australian Gastroenterology Week (AGW) 2007 & Developments in Ulcerative Colitis

Britains Andy Murray has often spoken of marathon sushi-eating sessions during training, downing huge bowls of pasta before matches and wolfing two entire baguettes stuffed with chicken afterwards. Djokovic, on the other hand, credits his ascent to world No 1 after years of being dogged by ill-health to a strict gluten-free diet. That means no bread, no pasta and nothing made with flour. As fad diets go, its almost as old-hat as The Atkins. So could it really be the key to his sporting success? Moreover, could it also give us mere mortals a dietary advantage? THE CELEBRITY INTOLERANCE Going gluten-free, usually shorthand for eradicating bread from the diet, has been linked to every skinny celebrity from Gwynnie to Minnie and even whippersnappers such as Miley Cyrus. Dieticians, ever sceptical, usually point out that cutting out gluten a protein found in grains that gives baked food its chewy texture is useful only if you have the debilitating medical condition coeliac disease, an incurable auto-immune disorder triggered by gluten which causes inflammation of the small bowel. So for most of us there should be no real benefit. Could this berry mean you can eat junk food guilt free? Lingonberries ‘halt the effects of high-fat diet’ Djokovic has never claimed to have coeliac disease but does speak of an intolerance to gluten, which leads to a crushing lack of energy and asthma-like symptoms. A few years ago, he hit a patch of bad form and was constantly dropping out of tournaments. It became a running joke with fellow competitors. Andy Roddick quipped in 2008: Two injured ankles, hip . . .

you can try these out http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2545845/This-gluten-free-diet-did-Djokovic-work-Its-dismissed-fad-Novak-Miley-swear-no-wheat-regime.html

Specialist to help ease wait times

In disease limited to the rectum, the mainstay of therapy includes topical aminosalicyclate (5-ASA) suppositories (small masses of medication that are designed to melt when inserted into a body cavity). Topical therapy refers to local application of treatment directly onto the surface of a body part. In more extensive cases where disease affects larger parts of the bowels, combination therapy involving 5-ASA agents (both oral and topical), steroids and other immunosuppressive agents is recommended. In a recent study conducted by Barclay et al, an increased use of medications which act to alter the immune response (immunomodulators) was demonstrated. Out of 1421 patients with inflammatory bowel disease, the use of immunomodulators including azathioprine, 6 mercaptopurine and methotrexate was investigated. Oral 5-ASA treatments were used in 77% of ulcerative colitis patients. Use of these medications correlated with increasing disease extent. In conclusion, IM use was high in these patients, compared with previous studies. This was thought to be primarily due to changing clinical practice, rather than changes in disease severity. Response to Infliximab Therapy in Patients with Severe Ulcerative ColitisThe efficacy of Infliximab in outpatients with moderate – severe ulcerative colitis has been well demonstrated. Studies have been conducted in an attempt to further investigate the use of Infliximab as rescue therapy in a subset of severe hospitalised patients and also to try to reduce the numbers of people requiring surgery for removal of areas of bowel affected by ulcerative colitis. However, these studies only involved limited numbers of patients and were too small to identify patient factors which predict response.

read this http://www.virtualmedicalcentre.com/news/australian-gastroenterology-week-agw-2007-and-developments-in-ulcerative-colitis/10803

Wily Cyrus: As well as doing crunches throughout the days and practicing Pilates, Miley Cyrus sticks to a diet free from gluten

September figures show priority-one gastroenterology patients waited an average 47 days to be seen at the outpatient clinic – 50 per cent longer than the recommended 30-day maximum – and category-two patients waited an average 16 weeks. But waiting times have improved since a year ago, when some children waited up to a year to be assessed because of an acute shortage of gastroenterologists. It prompted the State Government to launch an urgent recruitment drive for specialists. The hospital says progress has been made after finding a gastroenterologist to fill a vacant position but it will have to take on more staff. A spokeswoman said PMH expected waiting times to improve further with a new part-time gastroenterologist due to start this month. Another 0.5 full-time equivalent position was in the appointment process and PMH was optimistic about appointing someone early next year. The Australian Medical Association welcomed the recent addition of a specialist but said it was clear more were needed to keep up with demand in the highly specialised area. WA president Richard Choong said gastroenterology was historically a difficult specialty to staff, which led to long delays for patients to be assessed and treated. “The fact PMH has managed to find someone recently and is close to more appointments is good news and very encouraging,” he said. “This is an area of medicine that is very specific and there are many conditions that need to access its services, but it’s a classic example of where there just aren’t enough people to do the jobs required.” Dr Choong said as a result many children were waiting too long, often in pain and discomfort, to be diagnosed and treated. “What I really hope is that the hospital will be able to recruit the extra staff it needs so children can be seen even more quickly,” he said.

visit website http://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/latest/a/19770024/specialist-to-help-ease-wait-times/

Indian-origin Doctor Charged With Sexual Assault In Uk

He said that there was no assistant present in the chamber at that time and the doctor was not wearing surgical gloves. The patient told the court that Shikotra seemed “obsessed” about information about his private parts. The victim said that eventually he agreed to a check-up but alleged that Shikotra started “massaging” him intimately and he felt nervous. “He (the doctor) asked me what turns me on at home, the victim said. “I realised by then what I should have realised way before – that what he was doing was wrong,” he added. The victim alleged that he did not know what to do. The accuser said, after leaving the doctor’s chamber “in a daze”, he confided in his sister. Defence counsel Andrew Hockton, however, accused the alleged victim of “telling lies” and said his allegations were “pure fantasy”. Hockton said the doctor never made inappropriate comments and carried out “an appropriate medical examination” following a request by the patient. The complainant reported the matter to a primary care trust three weeks later. “There was not a single entry (in the medical records) about the examination, what he had done or what he found when he did the examination, Claire Howell, prosecutor said.

websites http://zeenews.india.com/news/nation/indian-origin-doctor-charged-with-sexual-assault-in-uk_906312.html

Canadian Association Of Gastroenterology: Open Letter To Canadians

Waits are excessive for digestive checkups

One in four Canadians waiting to see a gastroenterologist is affected in his or her day-to-day functioning. One in three Canadians waiting to see a gastroenterologist experiences anxiety as a direct result of digestive problems. Canadian gastroenterologists and the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology (CAG) know Canadians have reason to worry. Digestive diseases represent 15% of the total economic burden of Canadian health costs and cause a loss of productivity reaching $1.14 billion annually. That’s more than mental, cardiovascular, respiratory or central nervous system diseases. Meanwhile, Canadians have told Statistics Canada that waiting lists and wait times rank among their top health concerns. Despite the harsh realities surrounding digestive disease, Canadians must wait an inordinate amount of time for gastro-intestinal consultations and access to specialized testing. Case in point: 25% of patients with alarm symptoms, indicators of disease such as cancer, are forced to wait 4 months before their case is seen by a specialist. That’s far longer than the 3 weeks Canadians have told us that they’re willing to wait. Frankly, four months is unacceptable. It is time we got our priorities straight. Surprisingly, in developing its wait list reform of the Canadian health care system, Paul Martin’s government overlooked digestive disease. The Canadian Association of Gastroenterology has sent a call to action to Prime Minister Paul Martin, urging him to include digestive disease as a health-care priority and ensure Canadian patients obtain necessary and timely access to our specialists.

click over here http://www.marketwired.com/press-release/Canadian-Association-of-Gastroenterology-Open-Letter-to-Canadians-554684.htm

The association’s study of 5,500 patient visits to nearly 200 Canadian gastroenterologists shows that 70 per cent of patients referred by family doctors wait more than two months to see a gastroenterologist and have a diagnostic test, while 50 per cent wait more than four months and 20 per cent wait more than 10 months. Continued Below Among these patients, more than one-third have alarm symptoms, which may indicate serious underlying disease such as cancer. Even patients classified as urgent are waiting two to five times longer than best practice targets recommend. Dr. Desmond Leddin, the association president and an associate professor of medicine at Dalhousie University in Halifax, calls the situation “unacceptable.” “We are able to see patients in a time frame that expert review would suggest is only appropriate 20 per cent of the time. There really is a severe problem in terms of wait times for gastroenterology and consultations.” Based on the results of the study, Leddin has asked Prime Minister Paul Martin to incorporate gastroenterology as a priority into the federal government’s program to reduce waiting times. “Patients are suffering while they’re on wait lists,” Leddin says. “And we quite frankly don’t understand why the first ministers and the federal government have identified five areas as a priority for wait time management but gastroenterology is not on that list.” Those five key areas are: cancer treatment, cardiac care, diagnostic imaging, joint replacements and sight restoration. A simple cash infusion to bolster human and technical resources will not remedy the current wait list situation, Leddin says. “Canadian gastroenterologists will need to work hand-in-hand with federal and provincial governments … and move toward the improved use of these resources. “We hope that by 2008 patients with digestive symptoms should not have to wait more than eight weeks to see a gastroenterologist.” With files from The Medical Post.

the best http://www.macleans.ca/science/health/article.jsp?content=20050928_173926_5724

Wait Times for Patients Who Need Gastroenterology Care Are Getting Longer

Each endoscope requires a complex and specific multi-stagecleaning processdictated not only by provincial and federal guidelines, but also by the manufacturer. The hospital says in this case, it wasn’t following the manufacturer’s specific guidelines for this specialized endoscope. “Endoscopes are particularly complex and difficult to clean because they’ve got very long, very narrow channels,” said infection prevention and control expert Dr. Mary Vearncombe. “It’s very difficult to make sure that those channels are flushed and disinfected properly in between uses, just because their diameter is so very narrow.” Dr. Armstong said the late discovery highlights a need to regularly review whether the team in charge of cleaning endoscopesis doing it properly. Common procedure He says the issue is analogous to the deadly E. coli contamination of the water supply in Walkerton, Ont. in 2000. In that case,procedures were in place to ensure safe drinking water, but checks weren’t done to ensure the processes were followed. “One knows what needs to be done to produce a safe water supply, but if the appropriate checks are put into place but they are not monitored and verified, then it’s possible to assume that everything’sOK and the processes are being followed without actually documenting that its actually done on a daily basis or a weekly basis,” said Armstrong,a McMaster University associate professor and consultant gastroenterologist at Hamilton Health Sciences. Every year, about 1.6 million endoscopic procedures are performed in Canada, a figure representing about five per cent of the population. Despite how common the procedure has become, hospitalstend totrack incidents of improper endoscope cleaning that result in patient harm on an ad-hoc basis, says Armstrong. Thatmeans the public only learns of problems when the media covers large-scale events disclosed by the hospital. “From the point of view of how often it actually happens, it’s actually very difficult to know, because without appropriate tracking mechanisms, this may just go undetected,” he said.

site http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/hospital-sterilization-how-problems-slip-through-1.1386740

Hospital sterilization: How problems slip through

Through its latest Canadian Association of Gastroenterology Survey of Access to GastroEnterology (SAGE) completed this April, results reveal a worrisome trend of longer wait times. Data was gathered from nearly 200 participating gastroenterologists who submitted information on approximately 2,000 patient interactions within the health system. SAGE surveys were also conducted in 2005 and 2008 . Over a seven-year period, the trend in longer wait times is evident according to soon to be published 2012 SAGE data. “Our analysis shows that patient wait times are now 30 days longer than they were in 2005,” says CAG Dr. Desmond Leddin, Lead on the CAG SAGE program. “This is a disturbing trend, and one which indicates a need to pursue strategies to ensure patients receive the digestive care they need in a more timely manner.” As an example, the recent SAGE data shows that a patient with a high likelihood of severe Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) can expect a total wait time of 126 days. Of these 126 days, patients wait on average 72 days for a consultation and 44 days for a diagnostic endoscopy. Given the target total wait time of 14 days for this disease category, these patients are waiting 16 weeks longer than the recommended wait time target. (See fact sheet ) “The gap between current wait times and the desired target is too wide and wait times are getting longer,” says Dr. Dan Sadowski, President of the CAG. “In human terms, what this means is that many patients live with pain and some are unable to work or attend school and can only do so with difficulty while waiting for consultation and treatment.” This year, the WTA report is shedding more light on the total wait time(i) Canadians can experience in receiving necessary medical care. Thanks to the total wait times data collected and provided by CAG, the WTA report is now more comprehensive than ever. “The CAG has been a source of robust information for our expanded focus on wait times”, says Dr.

you can try these out http://finance.yahoo.com/news/wait-times-patients-gastroenterology-care-150600053.html

Locum Consultant Gastroenterologist, N.ireland

the Health and Care Professions Council, General Pharmaceutical Council, General Medical Council etc). Relevant experience of the role you are applying for. You will also be required to complete the following prior to any offer of work: A Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check (formerly CRB check), Mediplacements can assist you with this process (please note this is not applicable for Medical Lab Staff). Full occupational health clearance regarding immunisations etc. in the form of a valid ‘fitness to practice certificate’ as per current Government Procurement Service (GPS) standards (e.g. an occupational health report stating dates of your last TB, Hep B immunisations etc.). Please enter your full name: Please enter your email address: Please enter your phone number: Please attach your CV: Genuine specialist suppliers with a proven track record We only recruit for the medical sector and during our 18 years trading history we have established long term relationships with most Hospital trusts and healthcare organisations. In-depth knowledge of the Doctors sector We have real knowledge and understanding of every individual medical specialty we supply in to and endeavour to place every candidate into jobs which will best match their skills and experience. Government Procurement Service (GPS) Approved Mediplacements are delighted to confirm our inclusion on the latest NHS National Framework Agreements (NFA) for the provision of Allied Health Professionals, Health Science Services Staff and Hospital Doctors. Your own dedicated consultant that only covers the Doctors profession Every medical sector we recruit for has there own team of consultants only supporting that medical specialty. Providing consistent, well informed help and advice at every stage of the recruitment process. Network of exclusive contracts (NHS & Private sector) Mediplacements have many exclusive contracts with NHS trusts and private sector healthcare companies including NHS South Central, Guy’s & St Thomas’s NHS trust, Salisbury NHS Foundation trust and Spire Healthcare to name but a few! Excellent pay rates and candidate loyalty scheme Mediplacements pays its locum workforce the best pay rates available.

their website http://www.mediplacements.com/10295-locum_consultant-job.html

Australian Gastroenterology Week (agw) 2007 & Developments In Ulcerative Colitis

In a recent study conducted by Barclay et al, an increased use of medications which act to alter the immune response (immunomodulators) was demonstrated. Out of 1421 patients with inflammatory bowel disease, the use of immunomodulators including azathioprine, 6 mercaptopurine and methotrexate was investigated. Oral 5-ASA treatments were used in 77% of ulcerative colitis patients. Use of these medications correlated with increasing disease extent. In conclusion, IM use was high in these patients, compared with previous studies. This was thought to be primarily due to changing clinical practice, rather than changes in disease severity. Response to Infliximab Therapy in Patients with Severe Ulcerative ColitisThe efficacy of Infliximab in outpatients with moderate – severe ulcerative colitis has been well demonstrated. Studies have been conducted in an attempt to further investigate the use of Infliximab as rescue therapy in a subset of severe hospitalised patients and also to try to reduce the numbers of people requiring surgery for removal of areas of bowel affected by ulcerative colitis. However, these studies only involved limited numbers of patients and were too small to identify patient factors which predict response. Ulcerative colitis is a chronic medical condition that can have significant effects on your quality of life and the way that you function. Although there is no cure, advances in medical treatments allow doctors to try and control the disease and remain on top of your symptoms. Multiple different treatments are available for treatment of ulcerative colitis, depending on the location and extent of disease. Combinations of 5-ASA agents and therapies that act on your immune system have been widely studied. Research findings regarding the causes and genetics surrounding ulcerative colitis help us understand the causes and associations related to the disease. Many patients will be able to live active and productive lifestyles, with regular medical treatment and close observation for disease progression and treatment complications. The next AGW meeting will be held in Brisbane, from 22 – 26th October, 2008.

site http://www.virtualmedicalcentre.com/news/australian-gastroenterology-week-agw-2007-and-developments-in-ulcerative-colitis/10803

Specialist to help ease wait times

September figures show priority-one gastroenterology patients waited an average 47 days to be seen at the outpatient clinic – 50 per cent longer than the recommended 30-day maximum – and category-two patients waited an average 16 weeks. But waiting times have improved since a year ago, when some children waited up to a year to be assessed because of an acute shortage of gastroenterologists. It prompted the State Government to launch an urgent recruitment drive for specialists. The hospital says progress has been made after finding a gastroenterologist to fill a vacant position but it will have to take on more staff. A spokeswoman said PMH expected waiting times to improve further with a new part-time gastroenterologist due to start this month. Another 0.5 full-time equivalent position was in the appointment process and PMH was optimistic about appointing someone early next year. The Australian Medical Association welcomed the recent addition of a specialist but said it was clear more were needed to keep up with demand in the highly specialised area. WA president Richard Choong said gastroenterology was historically a difficult specialty to staff, which led to long delays for patients to be assessed and treated. “The fact PMH has managed to find someone recently and is close to more appointments is good news and very encouraging,” he said. “This is an area of medicine that is very specific and there are many conditions that need to access its services, but it’s a classic example of where there just aren’t enough people to do the jobs required.” Dr Choong said as a result many children were waiting too long, often in pain and discomfort, to be diagnosed and treated. “What I really hope is that the hospital will be able to recruit the extra staff it needs so children can be seen even more quickly,” he said.

visit homepage http://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/latest/a/19770024/specialist-to-help-ease-wait-times/